Helmet wreck (also known as the “Depth charge wreck”)
* Length: 60 m / 200 ft
* Beam: 7 m / 23 ft
* Tons: t
* Bottom depth: 30 m / 100 ft
* From DayDream: 2 min
* Wreck damage level: very small

Expected total dive time:
* Recreational air diver: 25 to 30 min
* Recreational nitrox diver: 30 to 40 min
* Tec diver: ~ 60 min
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More about Helmet:
Helmet wreck is definitely a “must do” wreck in Palau. The post war salvage operations did clearly miss this one and thanks to that, it is still very intact and contains a lot of interesting stuff to explore. The name “Helmet wreck” comes from the amount of Helmets that can be seen stacked together in the ship. Since identifying the ship has been without any success, the name is still used. At discovery in the 80´s wreck researcher also called it the “Depth charge wreck” referring to all the depth chargers lying around in the wreck holds.

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The dive depth varies from 15-35 meter with the shallowest parts at the stern and then getting deeper towards the bow. The holds are easy accessible through since they are all wide open. Inside the hold in the bow you can see engines for the Zeke fighter planes together with electronic equipment. The stern hold contains a big number of depth chargers. Other interesting things to see on the wreck are ammunition, gas masks, lanterns and old sake bottles. Remember to not touch anything since there still are explosive ammo and depth chargers lying around.

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This wreck is available for any kind of skill level but if you want more time to explore the wreck we strongly recommend using nitrox. For the more experienced wreck diver there are some interesting penetrating opportunities into the engine room and wheelhouse area.
This Japanese coaster of a wreck is still a bit of a mystery in Palau. Why is it not registered in any navy records? According to records it took 7 bombs and 4 torpedoes to sink the ship. The bomb finally making the fatal strike seems to be the one hitting the aft hold, ripping it wide open on its starboard side. It is quite remarkable that the huge amount of depth chargers did not go of during this strike.


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